Posted tagged ‘Adlestrop’

The Lake Isle Of Innisfree

3 August 2009

The  Lake  Isle  Of  Innisfree

by

William Butler Yeats

I will arise and go now, and go to Innisfree,
And a small cabin build there, of clay and wattles made;
Nine bean rows will I have there, a hive for the honey bee,
And live alone in the bee-loud glade.

And I shall have some peace there, for peace comes dropping slow,
Dropping from the veils of the morning to where the cricket sings;
There midnight’s all a glimmer, and noon a purple glow,
And evening full of the linnet’s wings.

I will arise and go now, for always night and day
I hear lake water lapping with low sounds by the shore;
While I stand on the roadway, or on the pavements gray,
I hear it in the deep heart’s core.

This poem draws an enchanting picture of an idyllic place where Yeats yearns to be – it contrasts between where man is and where he would like to be. The feeling of time standing still, which is shared with the previously posted poem ‘Adlestrop‘, is a rare quality in a poem.

William_Butler_Yeats_by_John_Singer_Sargent_1908

In Yeats own words.

“my first lyric with anything in its rhythm of my own music”

Hear Yeats recite it in his own voice here.

But be prepared for the Irish accent which, considered musical by many, jars my unlearned Indian ears.  Each of us hears poetry recited in one’s mind very differently from the way some one else would recite it.

Credits – See embedded links. The lake picture above, taken from Wikimedia Commons,  is not Lough Gill in which Innisfree resides but another beautiful Irish lake.

Adlestrop

15 July 2009

Some of my favourite nature poems are short. Being poetry they often carry a message, but the poets were real wordsmiths – with a few words they drew a picture, a mood, a point of view, a celebration. Of the railway poems, Edward Thomas‘ 16 line poem about Adlestrop railway station exudes a peaceful summer afternoon from every word.

Adlestrop railway station today which was the inspiration for the Poet, Edward Thomas in the summer of 1914 when the train he was travelling on stopped 'unwontedly' at this quiet station. Disused since 1966. Image - Philip Halling.

Adlestrop railway station today which was the inspiration for the Poet, Edward Thomas in the summer of 1914 when the train he was travelling on stopped ‘unwontedly’ at this quiet station. Disused since 1966. Image – Philip Halling.

Adlestrop

by

Edward Thomas

Yes, I remember Adlestrop —
The name, because one afternoon
Of heat the express-train drew up there
Unwontedly. It was late June.

The steam hissed. Someone cleared his throat.
No one left and no one came
On the bare platform. What I saw
Was Adlestrop — only the name

And willows, willow-herb, and grass,
And meadowsweet, and haycocks dry,
No whit less still and lonely fair
Than the high cloudlets in the sky.

And for that minute a blackbird sang
Close by, and round him, mistier,
Farther and farther, all the birds
Of Oxfordshire and Gloucestershire.

Image credit – Philip Halling. Image taken from Wikimedia Commons. Licensed under Creative Commons Share-alike Attribution 2.0.