DYK – The bacteria that could survive the shock of a supernova

Do you know…

… that an extremophile bacteria Paracoccus denitrificans has been found to grow even under 400,000 times Earth’s gravity, a fact having implications on the feasibility of panspermia?

Paracoccus denitrificans
(Image credit: Richard Evans-Gowing at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK. Colorized by Leila Hornick.. Click image to reach source)

That kind of gravity is found only in cosmic environments such as truly gigantic stars or the shockwave of a supernova. Such a bacteria would theoretically be suited for interstellar travel!

"On October 9, 1604, sky watchers -- including astronomer Johannes Kepler, spotted a "new star" in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of nearby planets. "Kepler's supernova" was the last exploding supernova seen in our Milky Way galaxy. Observers used only their eyes to study it, because the telescope had not yet been invented. Now, astronomers have utilized NASA's three Great Observatories to analyze the supernova remnant in infrared, optical and X-ray light." - Chandra X-ray Observatory

Kepler’s Supernova
“On October 9, 1604, sky watchers — including astronomer Johannes Kepler, spotted a “new star” in the western sky, rivaling the brilliance of nearby planets. “Kepler’s supernova” was the last exploding supernova seen in our Milky Way galaxy. Observers used only their eyes to study it, because the telescope had not yet been invented. Now, astronomers have utilized NASA’s three Great Observatories to analyze the supernova remnant in infrared, optical and X-ray light.”
– Chandra X-ray Observatory
Image Credit : NASA, Public domain

A very, very interesting bacteria, read about it here :

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paracoccus_denitrificans

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